All posts tagged: buenos aires

Building Latin America

More than a half-century after its landmark 1955 exhibition, New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is revisiting the fascinating terrain of Latin American architecture. Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980 provides a complex overview of architectural innovation spanning eleven countries: Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Venezuela, Mexico, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. Sprawling cities such as Mexico City and São Paulo were among the fastest growing cities in the world at this time. The region’s unprecedented urbanization was characterized by avant-garde artistic practices, often in challenging political circumstances. During this period, a number of Latin American countries experienced volatile political change. Many saw periods of military dictatorship. Bringing together the architectural achievements of such a large continent for over three decades is no mean feat. Please continue reading in the May/June issue of The Kurios, out now. Photo credits: Affonso Eduardo Reidy. Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro (MAM), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1934-1947. ©Núcleo de Documentação e Pesquisa? Faculdade de Arquitetura e Urbanismo da Universidade Federal do Rio …

Lunar mysteries

Eugenio Cuttica: The inward gaze at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires brings together the paintings of the Argentine artist Eugenio Cuttica from the 1970s to the current day. The first part of the exhibition presents Cuttica’s early works, in which he grappled with new forms of expression. Cuttica was part of an expressionist revival that took place in Argentina in the 1980s. This room also includes a painting by Argentina’s most celebrated impressionist painter, Fernando Fader, which Cuttica selected from the museum collection himself. The second room showcases a series of Cuttica’s paintings from the 1980s and 1990s which present large-scale mythical themes. Finally we are presented with a series of the artist’s latest works, centred on the representation of a little girl known as Luna (Moon). In these semi-fantastical paintings, the figure of the girl dissolves mysteriously into a landscape, suggesting a ghostly presence. Eugenio Cuttica is featured in the May/June issue of The Kurios. Get your copy here. Photo courtesy of Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes.