All posts tagged: exhibitions

Alternative reality: Sara Ramo’s blurred boundaries

Spanish artist Sara Ramo (b.1975) recently presented new works, including videos, photographs and sculptures – at Galeria Fortes Vilaça in Sao Paolo. The works in Os Ajudantes (The Helpers) blur the boundaries between reality and fiction. In one video, twelve masked creatures wander through a dark landscape, playing musical instruments. Under the flickering light of bonfires, their appearance comes and goes, lending the video a mysterious atmosphere. Bereft of any narrative, we are left pondering the reality of these odd creatures, which at times appear familiar and at other times, completely foreign. In the series Matriz e a Perversão da Forma (Matrix and the Perversion of Form), the artist presents sculptures made of dental stone. Each piece is a mixture of the real – its material is something we recognize – but the shape is unfamiliar. As in the video, we are confronted with fragments of a whole, which has a distancing effect on the viewer. Sara Ramo was born in 1975 in Madrid, Spain, and currently lives and works between the city of her …

Clouds talking: Yo-Yo-Gonthier and the erasure of memory

The group show Presences, at the Ivory Coast’s Galerie Cécile Fakhoury, brings together the work of four artists: Nestor Da, François-Xavier Gbré, Yo-Yo-Gonthier and Cheikh Ndiaye. The gallery has been turned into a shared studio space for the exhibition. Yo-Yo Gonthier’s work (seen in the photo above) is inspired by exploration, conquest, discovery and voyage, both of the physical and fantastical kind. Through film, drawing, printing, photography and performance, the artist “invites the viewer to a historic reading of universal forms and subjects,” the curators said. “Yo-Yo Gonthier is a composer – of lines, of meaning, of sounds. The materiality of his work is the result,” they added. Yo-Yo Gonthier was born in Niamey, Niger, in 1974. The artist now lives and works in Paris. His work deals with the erasure of memory in the Western World through its preoccupation with speed, technology and progress. To continue reading this article, please subscribe to the September/October 2015 issue here, or by searching for The Kurios App on your mobile device. Presences in on at Galerie Cécile …

Deccan opulence

An exhibition at New York’s Met brings together some two hundred works of art from the opulent Deccan courts of India. The Deccan sultanates were five dynasties of Afghan, Turk, Mongol and various other ethnic backgrounds that ruled kingdoms in the south-west of India during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Featuring paintings in a lyrical poetic style, vivid textiles and intricate metalwork, these works are the result of a unique melting pot of cultural influence in the sultan’s courts. The splendour of these courts, which were built on the wealth of the diamond-rich regions of the south-west, attracted artists, writers and traders from Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Their influences combined to produce artwork of compelling beauty and lyrical charm. Sultans of Deccan India 1500-1700: Opulence and Fantasy is on at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until July 26th 2015. Image: Attributed the Bombay painter (probably named Abdul Hamid Naqqash). Sultan ‘Ali ‘Adil Shah II Shooting an Arrow at a Tiger (detail). Bijapur, ca. 1660. Ink, opaque watercolor, gold and probably lapis lazuli pigment on paper. The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Lent …

Blurred lines

In Boris Nzebo’s multi-layered works, human heads merge with urban cityscapes. These boldly coloured and patterned works evoke the visual dynamism of a West African city. Born in 1979 in Gabon, Nzebo now lives and works in Cameroon. He draws his subject matter from his hometown of Douala, where he is particularly inspired by the elaborate hairstyles of locals, which often feature as hand-painted advertising illustrations in West African beauty parlours. To continue reading about Boris Nzebo and see more images of his work, read the July/August issue of The Kurios. Photo: © Boris Nzebo. Photo courtesy of Saatchi Gallery, London.

Bold enigmas

You could be forgiven for thinking that some of the work by Chinese artist Zhu Da, better known as Bada Shanren, is by a contemporary artist. Born in 1626, Bada Shanren is remembered as reclusive and somewhat eccentric. He produced highly individualist works which were daring for their time, some of which have been brought together for the exhibition Enigmas: The Art of Bada Shanren, at Washington’s Freer Gallery of Art. The artist,who was born a prince of the Ming imperial house, later retired to live a secluded life as a Buddhist monk. It is said that he suffered from epilepsy and became dumb. The direct, expressive style of his ink paintings of birds and flowers does not jar with contemporary viewers. His work has been very influential in China but also in Japan, where his bold style is particularly appreciated for its similarity to Zen painting. To continue reading about Bada Shanren, check out the July/August 2015 issue of The Kurios. Photo: Lotus, Bada Shanren (Zhu Da) (1626-1705). China, Qing dynasty, ca. 1665. Bequest from the collection of Wang Fangyu …

Lunar mysteries

Eugenio Cuttica: The inward gaze at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires brings together the paintings of the Argentine artist Eugenio Cuttica from the 1970s to the current day. The first part of the exhibition presents Cuttica’s early works, in which he grappled with new forms of expression. Cuttica was part of an expressionist revival that took place in Argentina in the 1980s. This room also includes a painting by Argentina’s most celebrated impressionist painter, Fernando Fader, which Cuttica selected from the museum collection himself. The second room showcases a series of Cuttica’s paintings from the 1980s and 1990s which present large-scale mythical themes. Finally we are presented with a series of the artist’s latest works, centred on the representation of a little girl known as Luna (Moon). In these semi-fantastical paintings, the figure of the girl dissolves mysteriously into a landscape, suggesting a ghostly presence. Eugenio Cuttica is featured in the May/June issue of The Kurios. Get your copy here. Photo courtesy of Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes.